The Research

Dexalytics is based on over 30 years of university research working with DXA. Our bodycomposition research spans from high school to professional athletes and extends to infants, the elderly and everything in between. We have published normative body composition data, using DXA, in both professional and collegiate football players with samples of over 350 individual athletes. Our group is part of the Consortium for College Athlete Research (C-CAR) that pools DXA data from five universities from Power Five Conferences with the goal of publishing normative DXA data for a variety of university sports. 

First and foremost, we believe that the accuracy and reliability of the data is critical, in particular in elite sport.  Secondly, we strive to move body composition beyond totals measures. Traditional metrics of percentage of body fat, total lean mass (or fat-free mass in 2- component methods) and total fat mass don’t tell the complete picture for athletes. The distribution of fat and lean mass as well as the ratios of distribution are critical for how athletes move their body through space. Truly understanding what your body is, will be critical identifying what your body can do.


Who are we?

Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Minnesota. He serves as the Director of the Human Performance Core and Densitometry Services at the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, which provides clinical vascular, metabolic, exercise and body composition testing for researchers across the University of Minnesota...

Tyler Bosch, Ph.D.

Tyler Bosch, PhD earned his Master’s and Doctoral degree from the School of Kinesiology at the University of Minnesota. Following his doctorate, he completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Minnesota Medical School studying the effect of exercise on glucose and lipid metabolism using isotopic tracer techniques...

Learn More About Our Research

Football Player

Abdominal body composition difference in NFL football players.

Author: Bosch et al

J Strength Cond Res 28(12):3313-3319, 2014.

Football Player

Dengel et al: Body composition of National Football League players.

Author: Dengel et al

J Strength Cond Res 28(1):1-6, 2014.

Volleyball Player

In adult twins, visceral fat accumulation depends more on exceeding sex-specific adiposity thresholds than on genetics.

Author: Bosch et al

Metabolism 64:991-998, 2015.

Basketball Player

Fitness level is associated with sex-specific regional fat differences in normal weight young adults.

Author: Bosch et al

J Endocrinol Diabetes 2(2):1-5, 2015.

Basketball Player

Accuracy and reliability of assessing lateral compartmental leg composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Author: Dengel, Bosch et al

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 49(4):833-839, 2017.

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Donald Dengel, Ph.D.

Donald Dengel, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Minnesota. He serves as the Director of the Human Performance Core and Densitometry Services at the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, which provides clinical vascular, metabolic, exercise and body composition testing for researchers across the University of Minnesota. Dr. Dengel also directs the Human Performance Teaching Laboratory for the School of Kinesiology, which is one of the leading teaching facilities for both human and exercise physiology as well as anatomy and biomechanics laboratory methods in the United States.

Since 1990, Dr. Dengel’s research has focused on body composition and its effects on insulin sensitivity and peripheral vascular function.  Dr. Dengel has being using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) since 1995 to measure body composition.  His use of DXA extends from studies in animals to humans from as young as 6 months to over 80 years.  His studies in humans involves not only athletes, but master athletes, children and individuals with chronic spinal cord injury. He has used DXA to track body composition in changes due to aerobic exercise, weight loss, resistance training.  More recently he has used DXA to examine visceral abdominal fat as well as developing normative body composition values for athletes and predicting sports performance and injury.

He has published over 125 scientific manuscripts and 5 book chapters in the area of body composition, insulin sensitivity, oxygen uptake kinetics and vascular structure and function in children and adults. Dr. Dengel is a Fellow in the National Academy of Kinesiology, the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association.

Tyler Bosch, Ph.D.

Tyler Bosch, PhD earned his Master’s and Doctoral degree from the School of Kinesiology at the University of Minnesota. Following his doctorate, he completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Minnesota Medical School studying the effect of exercise on glucose and lipid metabolism using isotopic tracer techniques. His research has focused on body composition and substrate metabolism in several populations and he has collaborated with researchers across the United States. He has been using DXA in research since 2005 and has developed a novel method for measuring the anterior and posterior compartments of the upper leg using DXA.

In between his Master’s and PhD work he served as the Director of Sports Performance for Fitness Revolution in Chicago, IL. Tyler has been involved in sports and performance training for most of his life as both an athlete and coach. He has over ten years’ experience training athletes of all levels as well as coaching soccer across all levels. During his PhD he served as the Director of Coaching and Curriculum at Leftfoot Coaching Academy, a dedicated soccer training facility in Minneapolis, MN.  In addition to Dexalytics, Tyler serves as a Research Scientist in the College of Education and Human Development. He works with a number of collegiate and professional sports teams to improve how they collect, analyze, and interpret the data they collect on their athletes.